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  #11  
Old 05-01-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2249765]Guess I was hoping for another member of club soccer. Would love another option for NEP and NPL. I dare dream of an ECNL club up here someday. This offering isn't really of interest. You're right. Plenty of options at this level already.[/QUOTE]

ECNL level in NH will never be successful. There arenít enough truly elite players to field a team.

I donít know how more clubs will cause talent to be pooled, it will only dilute further. Also all clubs are similar and they do offer stronger coaching and more opportunity but the will always be mos focused on the highest/best teams and players. Itís the nature of the beast. I find parents of B and C teams complain the most and I totally get it - you watch the elite tram get the best of everything. My advice is always the same - tell your son or daughter to work harder or just accept the B team as is.
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  #12  
Old 05-01-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2249481]Agreed. We particularly need more clubs who are genuinely interested in growing the game and developing players, and not clubs that are driven primarily by revenue and profit.[/QUOTE]


I donít understand this popular sentiment. Itís always parents of B and C team players that think they are being slighted because the A team is getting more. Some think their kid is better than they are and some realize they are B team players but still donít like not getting special treatment. I get it - no coach, changing coaches, not the same training times and frequencies, etc make you bitter and that your money is just being taken. Well life isnít fair. Your son or daughter can either work to get better or you can go back to a town team. You are choosing to play club and be on a lower team. Itís not the only option.
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  #13  
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250321]I donít understand this popular sentiment. Itís always parents of B and C team players that think they are being slighted because the A team is getting more. Some think their kid is better than they are and some realize they are B team players but still donít like not getting special treatment. I get it - no coach, changing coaches, not the same training times and frequencies, etc make you bitter and that your money is just being taken. Well life isnít fair. Your son or daughter can either work to get better or you can go back to a town team. You are choosing to play club and be on a lower team. Itís not the only option.[/QUOTE]

Agree to a point but if I'm paying $2k or more, yeah... there better be a coach! Maybe not the top guy but a consistent, professional coach! Being on the B team at a club that costs thousands doesn't mean I get treated like dirt. I don't understand why anyone would allow themselves to just accept that!
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  #14  
Old 05-01-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250321]I donít understand this popular sentiment. Itís always parents of B and C team players that think they are being slighted because the A team is getting more. Some think their kid is better than they are and some realize they are B team players but still donít like not getting special treatment. I get it - no coach, changing coaches, not the same training times and frequencies, etc make you bitter and that your money is just being taken. Well life isnít fair. Your son or daughter can either work to get better or you can go back to a town team. You are choosing to play club and be on a lower team. Itís not the only option.[/QUOTE]

I'm a coach and club administrator, and I don't have any soccer playing kids so I like to think my perspective is reasonably objective, although it is skewed by growing up and playing in the UK.

I understand that the American vision of capitalism is rampant - from healthcare to MLS to youth soccer. It's a billion dollar industray and there are many capitalists whose only concern is to take and grow their profits. Great for them; they have a product, they have a market, there is a price.

This means that the top, profit-driven superclubs are primarily concerned with a families ability to pay. Yes, there are players who get a break here and there and there are some players who ride for free, but in all of these cases that I've heard about, it's a marketing tool. They will let players ride who will help get them wins. They will offer some scholarships here and there so they can obfuscate the true purpose of their business enterprise: making money.

On the other hand, you have some clubs like LHIFA, Mount Washington Valley, Lakes and Region United, and many others who strive to offer a new type of soccer club - affordable community based and volunteer led clubs that are able to provide better coaching and opportunites than town soccer.

These are the types of clubs who can, over time, provide a whole generation of soccer fans and players in the state from all walks of life. These are the types of clubs that need the support of USYS or USCS to thrive.

I was looking at a league standings page recently. This particular division had 11 teams. 9 of those teams were either Seacoast or GPS. That to me is just sad.
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  #15  
Old 05-01-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250490]I'm a coach and club administrator, and I don't have any soccer playing kids so I like to think my perspective is reasonably objective, although it is skewed by growing up and playing in the UK.

I understand that the American vision of capitalism is rampant - from healthcare to MLS to youth soccer. It's a billion dollar industray and there are many capitalists whose only concern is to take and grow their profits. Great for them; they have a product, they have a market, there is a price.

This means that the top, profit-driven superclubs are primarily concerned with a families ability to pay. Yes, there are players who get a break here and there and there are some players who ride for free, but in all of these cases that I've heard about, it's a marketing tool. They will let players ride who will help get them wins. They will offer some scholarships here and there so they can obfuscate the true purpose of their business enterprise: making money.

On the other hand, you have some clubs like LHIFA, Mount Washington Valley, Lakes and Region United, and many others who strive to offer a new type of soccer club - affordable community based and volunteer led clubs that are able to provide better coaching and opportunites than town soccer.

These are the types of clubs who can, over time, provide a whole generation of soccer fans and players in the state from all walks of life. These are the types of clubs that need the support of USYS or USCS to thrive.

I was looking at a league standings page recently. This particular division had 11 teams. 9 of those teams were either Seacoast or GPS. That to me is just sad.[/QUOTE]

Great perspective. I am happy there are clubs out there filling a niche for those who want more than town soccer but maybe can't afford the price of the big clubs, or just don't want that experience.

Question for you though. What about those few kids who are REALLY serious about the sport? I'm talking the ones who live to play and have goals of college or beyond (whether those dreams will ever materialize or not). Do those middle ground clubs work or do they need the big guys to have a chance?
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  #16  
Old 05-01-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250499]Question for you though. What about those few kids who are REALLY serious about the sport? I'm talking the ones who live to play and have goals of college or beyond (whether those dreams will ever materialize or not). Do those middle ground clubs work or do they need the big guys to have a chance?[/QUOTE]

With the options available to them right now in this area, yes clubs like GPS and Seacoast are required. Until one of 3 things happen:

1) MLS/NERevs get serious about youth development. I could imagine a scenario where Revolution have multiple fee-free satellite locations.

2) Continued growth of semi-professional/other professional clubs (where eventually they will see associated youth teams as an investment or community payback instead of a revenue generator)

3) Support from USYS and USCS for more fee-free 'regional' or 'select' teams.

When I first heard of ODP in NH I was thrilled to find out there was a pathway for those players on USYS teams who had the ability to step up for training and games at a higher level. I was appalled to find out that NH ODP is also 'pay-to-play' and is operated out of a single location. Well 2 if you count moving from Milford in the winter to Pembroke in spring.

Here is how I would run ODP if I had a say -

1) Have ODP coaches as volunteer (expenses only)

2) Ask these coaches to scout NH USYS teams through fall and engage with USYS club teams to create a list of strongest players

3)Host an early, free, Spring tournament at Pembroke with multiple 'Select' teams by splitting the state into regions and inviting players to try outs

4)Announce a state squad

5) Have the state squad practice together 3-5 times, play a scrimmage or two, then go to the Region 1 ODP tournament
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  #17  
Old 05-02-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2249616]So how do you know the new club won't have that also! Grass isn't always greener! There are many clubs playing in NHSL, so this doesn't seem to be any different than Amherst, BAC, or Nashua WC. Am I missing something?[/QUOTE]

Knowing the coaches listed on the PeakFC website for over a decade, you wont find a better quality set of coaches anywhere. They are pretty modest n their resumes - these are established and highly respected coaches both at the club, high school, and collegiate levels.
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  #18  
Old 05-02-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250839]Knowing the coaches listed on the PeakFC website for over a decade, you wont find a better quality set of coaches anywhere. They are pretty modest n their resumes - these are established and highly respected coaches both at the club, high school, and collegiate levels.[/QUOTE]

I know them as well, and you are giving them a tad much credit. Good, but temper it a little bit there.
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  #19  
Old 05-02-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250839]Knowing the coaches listed on the PeakFC website for over a decade, you wont find a better quality set of coaches anywhere. They are pretty modest n their resumes - these are established and highly respected coaches both at the club, high school, and collegiate levels.[/QUOTE]

I know a couple of them and so far I like what I've heard about this club and what they are trying to achieve.
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  #20  
Old 05-02-2018
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[QUOTE=Unregistered;2250530]With the options available to them right now in this area, yes clubs like GPS and Seacoast are required. Until one of 3 things happen:

1) MLS/NERevs get serious about youth development. I could imagine a scenario where Revolution have multiple fee-free satellite locations.

2) Continued growth of semi-professional/other professional clubs (where eventually they will see associated youth teams as an investment or community payback instead of a revenue generator)

3) Support from USYS and USCS for more fee-free 'regional' or 'select' teams.

When I first heard of ODP in NH I was thrilled to find out there was a pathway for those players on USYS teams who had the ability to step up for training and games at a higher level. I was appalled to find out that NH ODP is also 'pay-to-play' and is operated out of a single location. Well 2 if you count moving from Milford in the winter to Pembroke in spring.

Here is how I would run ODP if I had a say -

1) Have ODP coaches as volunteer (expenses only)

2) Ask these coaches to scout NH USYS teams through fall and engage with USYS club teams to create a list of strongest players

3)Host an early, free, Spring tournament at Pembroke with multiple 'Select' teams by splitting the state into regions and inviting players to try outs

4)Announce a state squad

5) Have the state squad practice together 3-5 times, play a scrimmage or two, then go to the Region 1 ODP tournament[/QUOTE]

I would almost rather have the Revs give up their youth programs at the youngest ages (U13-U15) and put that money toward developing a 2nd team playing in the USL, so that those graduating out of the Revs youth academy system have somewhere to continue their development. Right now, players either try for a homegrown contract (which worked out for Fagundez, but I'd imagine most players would end up sitting for years, like Herivaux), or going to play in college (which for the majority of players, ends their soccer careers).

The Revs are sinking a lot of money into their youth program, albeit much less than all the other MLS organizations, but the coaching staff and training environment are not much better than non-MLS DA teams or even the highest level club teams. The Revs are mostly staying afloat because they are free and can thus attract high level players, rather than due to the quality of the program. Three homegrown players is all they have to show, so they might want to leave the youth development to people who know what they're doing. I can't imagine how poor the training and coaching would be at satellite locations. If free, it would at least get disadvantaged kids into the system. Ultimately though, if good enough, these kids would have to travel down to Foxboro to train with the DA teams three times a week, which would be a real hardship for those families. If Seacoast could build their PDL into a USL, we'd be in business, with a nice pathway from U-little to pro and a good jumping off point for higher level pro. Much better than what the Revs are currently offering.

As for your ODP plan, I like most of it, especially at no cost. However, practicing 3-5 times with other strong players and good coaching, then playing in a tournament, would just not be enough. Yes, it would provide a little enrichment to a good player, but will certainly not make much a difference in their outcome long term. You need a DA type of environment (or better) if the kid has any chance of becoming a quality player. This, of course, can't be sustained for free, especially if you want quality coaches involved, and that's why are current system is what it is, pay-to-play with a few of the highest need players receiving scholarships.
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