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  #1  
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Default U.S. Women's Soccer Star: I'll Probably Never Sing the National Anthem Again

https://townhall.com/entertainment/c...again-n2546353
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Participation is a privilege not a right. If she doesnít like what the anthem stands for she should decline to participate. If she pulls any stunts while sheís there Iíd put her on the first plane back. Comparing womanís soccer to the NFL is ludicrous.
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There is no law forcing people to sing the anthem or even stand or speak the pledge of allegiance. If they want to write it into an employment contract they can go ahead and try.
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She has trouble with the high notes.
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Iím not a raging conservative, but if you want to play for a National team then you should honor the national symbol and stand for the flag and anthem. Otherwise step aside and give your spot to someone else. Iíd say the same thing to an active duty military member.

The NFL players have a different situation entirely because they arenít representing their country. They are speaking out as private citizens. And before someone chimes in that their employer should just can them remember that they arenít your average employee, they are essentially union employees under collective bargaining; and standing isnít part of their job as a football player. I believe private citizens have the constitutional right to stand/not stand if they choose to, especially as a form of protest.
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I think the whole team should walk and send a giant FU to the USSF over their wage inequality bullsh**
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Iím not a raging conservative, but if you want to play for a National team then you should honor the national symbol and stand for the flag and anthem. Otherwise step aside and give your spot to someone else. Iíd say the same thing to an active duty military member.

The NFL players have a different situation entirely because they arenít representing their country. They are speaking out as private citizens. And before someone chimes in that their employer should just can them remember that they arenít your average employee, they are essentially union employees under collective bargaining; and standing isnít part of their job as a football player. I believe private citizens have the constitutional right to stand/not stand if they choose to, especially as a form of protest.
I agree. You make total sense.
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Iím not a raging conservative, but if you want to play for a National team then you should honor the national symbol and stand for the flag and anthem. Otherwise step aside and give your spot to someone else. Iíd say the same thing to an active duty military member.

The NFL players have a different situation entirely because they arenít representing their country. They are speaking out as private citizens. And before someone chimes in that their employer should just can them remember that they arenít your average employee, they are essentially union employees under collective bargaining; and standing isnít part of their job as a football player. I believe private citizens have the constitutional right to stand/not stand if they choose to, especially as a form of protest.
Athletes should be allowed to protest as well. It is not a law to stand or say the pledge of allegiance or sing a song. There's plenty to protest about the US these days, including the lower pay for female NT players. An employer can try and put it in a contract and test it in court but if it isn't in their current contract oh well.
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Athletes should be allowed to protest as well. It is not a law to stand or say the pledge of allegiance or sing a song. There's plenty to protest about the US these days, including the lower pay for female NT players. An employer can try and put it in a contract and test it in court but if it isn't in their current contract oh well.
The WNT has signed a compensation contract with USSF. Why don't they honor that?! If they don't like let them walk. I am sure there are many who would take their place.
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Athletes should be allowed to protest as well. It is not a law to stand or say the pledge of allegiance or sing a song. There's plenty to protest about the US these days, including the lower pay for female NT players. An employer can try and put it in a contract and test it in court but if it isn't in their current contract oh well.
Pro Football is a private entertainment business watched primarily by red neck men. If they want them standing, the employer should be able to tell them to stand or walk. It's their right to protest. It's the companies right to fire them if they don't like it and believe it will hurt the business.
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