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  #1031  
Old 08-16-2019
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You got that backwards. The ukies parent mocked and attacked this team, parents, and the coaches for months now. This teams parents just defended their team.
We are FB Bucks ECNL 06 parents. Hear us roar!

Yawn.
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  #1032  
Old 08-16-2019
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We are FB Bucks ECNL 06 parents. Hear us roar!

Yawn.
Ukies parents all salty today huh? Sad
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  #1033  
Old 08-16-2019
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We are FB Bucks ECNL 06 parents. Hear us roar!

Yawn.
Serious question for the fc bucks parents on here. Do you guys have some sort of schedule amongst yourselves to keep watch on here in order to immediately respond to any negative comments.
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  #1034  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Serious question for the fc bucks parents on here. Do you guys have some sort of schedule amongst yourselves to keep watch on here in order to immediately respond to any negative comments.
Yes, our coaches set it up and we take shifts in return for guaranteed PT. Anyone who defends him more than 3x in a single shift will earn their kid an extra start.
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  #1035  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Yes, our coaches set it up and we take shifts in return for guaranteed PT. Anyone who defends him more than 3x in a single shift will earn their kid an extra start.
Game of Thrones, keyboard style. Winter is coming!
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  #1036  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Thumbs down Rich Finneyfrock

Rich Finneyfrock
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  #1037  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Vegas Odds are in for the tournament this weekend

RF doesn’t show up due to flu - 1 to 2
RF doesn’t show up due to work event - 5 to 2
RF doesn’t show up due to graduation/senior night – 7 to 3
RF is late to games – 1 to 3

Bets must be placed with dad coach no later than practice Thursday night
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  #1038  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Vegas Odds are in for the tournament this weekend

RF doesn’t show up due to flu - 1 to 2
RF doesn’t show up due to work event - 5 to 2
RF doesn’t show up due to graduation/senior night – 7 to 3
RF is late to games – 1 to 3

Bets must be placed with dad coach no later than practice Thursday night
I heard Flu has started early this year.
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  #1039  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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I have been reading this website from the sidelines for many months now. I have not chimed in until now. While many of the comments are unfortunate and totally unnecessary, there is some truth to the comments about having a “dad coach” at the ECNL level. I want to share my thoughts with you on being a “dad coach”. Most of you know who I am. I was once a “dad coach.” I coached my daughter and several of your daughters as well when they were younger and played rec soccer. When the kids are younger, it is cute to be a part of their lives as a coach of their team. Teams aren’t as competitive and there is no real pressure. Also, younger kids don’t care when one of their friends has their dad as the coach. That all changes as kids get older and rec soccer turns into hyper-competitive soccer that parents shell out 4 figure sums of money for. I consciously made the decision to not coach my children once they turned a certain age and reached a certain competitive level. I did not want to be in a position where I had to choose between being a dad and being a coach to my own daughter. I was concerned that if I stayed coaching my daughter I could be perceived as favoring her, and to avoid that perception, I might end up being too hard on her (which of course might impact my relationship with her as her dad). I decided it was a no-win situation. I selfishly didn’t want to put myself in that situation, and wanted to be able to be her dad 100% of the time, and not worry about having to separate being a dad and being a coach. But more importantly, I never wanted to put my daughter in that situation. I wanted her to be able to succeed or fail in soccer on her own. I didn’t want her to have to deal with the perception (Whether it was real or not) that she was receiving favorable treatment because I was her coach. Anyone with girls, knows teenage girls can be mean, and the last thing I wanted to do was put her in a situation where her teammates were viewing her with jealousy or thinking she was being treated differently because her dad was the coach. I also felt it was important for her to learn how to take direction from others, and not always have her dad around. After all, some day she will have a job (I hope), and I won’t be her boss, or be with her at work to make sure everything is ok between her and her boss. Just like it should be on the pitch, she would need to learn to succeed or fail or her own, because in real life, I won’t always be there for her. So my decision to step back was also an important life lesson for her too.
The current “Dad coach” is wonderful guy. His commitment to his children and his community should be celebrated. But I do think it is a fair question to ask why he continues to coach his daughter’s team at this age and this level of competitiveness. I also think it is a fair question to ask whether his continued participation as an assistant coach, and even as a manager, does more harm to his own daughter and the team as a whole, than any good he may be doing.

Just my two cents.
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  #1040  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I have been reading this website from the sidelines for many months now. I have not chimed in until now. While many of the comments are unfortunate and totally unnecessary, there is some truth to the comments about having a “dad coach” at the ECNL level. I want to share my thoughts with you on being a “dad coach”. Most of you know who I am. I was once a “dad coach.” I coached my daughter and several of your daughters as well when they were younger and played rec soccer. When the kids are younger, it is cute to be a part of their lives as a coach of their team. Teams aren’t as competitive and there is no real pressure. Also, younger kids don’t care when one of their friends has their dad as the coach. That all changes as kids get older and rec soccer turns into hyper-competitive soccer that parents shell out 4 figure sums of money for. I consciously made the decision to not coach my children once they turned a certain age and reached a certain competitive level. I did not want to be in a position where I had to choose between being a dad and being a coach to my own daughter. I was concerned that if I stayed coaching my daughter I could be perceived as favoring her, and to avoid that perception, I might end up being too hard on her (which of course might impact my relationship with her as her dad). I decided it was a no-win situation. I selfishly didn’t want to put myself in that situation, and wanted to be able to be her dad 100% of the time, and not worry about having to separate being a dad and being a coach. But more importantly, I never wanted to put my daughter in that situation. I wanted her to be able to succeed or fail in soccer on her own. I didn’t want her to have to deal with the perception (Whether it was real or not) that she was receiving favorable treatment because I was her coach. Anyone with girls, knows teenage girls can be mean, and the last thing I wanted to do was put her in a situation where her teammates were viewing her with jealousy or thinking she was being treated differently because her dad was the coach. I also felt it was important for her to learn how to take direction from others, and not always have her dad around. After all, some day she will have a job (I hope), and I won’t be her boss, or be with her at work to make sure everything is ok between her and her boss. Just like it should be on the pitch, she would need to learn to succeed or fail or her own, because in real life, I won’t always be there for her. So my decision to step back was also an important life lesson for her too.
The current “Dad coach” is wonderful guy. His commitment to his children and his community should be celebrated. But I do think it is a fair question to ask why he continues to coach his daughter’s team at this age and this level of competitiveness. I also think it is a fair question to ask whether his continued participation as an assistant coach, and even as a manager, does more harm to his own daughter and the team as a whole, than any good he may be doing.

Just my two cents.

Boy are you creepy! You actually typed all that? On a funny soccer forum site? If I was this “Dad coach” I would look into your post as this is not normal.
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