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  #21  
Old 09-16-2013
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Sounds to be like your darling soccer star may be slow. Maybe you should consider volleyball or golf. This game doesn't suit everyone's abilities
Hitting the nail on the head.
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  #22  
Old 09-16-2013
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Sounds to be like your darling soccer star may be slow. Maybe you should consider volleyball or golf. This game doesn't suit everyone's abilities
All I want is them to change the rules so that there must be four passes before a goal is allowed. That way, a girl who is un-athletic but a great finisher can have a chance up top.
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  #23  
Old 09-16-2013
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All I want is them to change the rules so that there must be four passes before a goal is allowed. That way, a girl who is un-athletic but a great finisher can have a chance up top.
Love it. I'm all for development, but this is what I see quite often - Possession, possession, possession 95% of the game. No or limited scoring. Move the fast girl up top, boot it to her, and score. If the goal is to win (e.g., HS), then I could really care less. It doesn't have to look pretty. If the goal is to develop (e.g., up to U16), it's a different story.

Isn't the US women's team winning? If your (original poster's) desire is to win "more beautifully," you're a bit delusional.
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  #24  
Old 09-16-2013
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If your kid is under the age of 18, my advice after 25 years in this business:

Play soccer (kids) to:

1. Have fun.

2. Learn important life skills such as hard work & discipline.

3. Develop life long friendships. Two of my kids are in college now. One is playing soccer, the other isn't. Both of them have very close friendships with kids they played soccer with. We had parents with both of my kids that were very active in organizing activities and birthday parties and bbq's..etc.

(side note: ironically, my daughter who was superior technically in every aspect didn't get any offers of assistance. My daughter who is a little lightning bolt, but not as skilled, is going to a very nice school that I never could have afforded..go figure).

4. Be active and develop habits of being active. Gets kids out of the house and running and off the TV, video games..etc.

Ignore the purists that talk about how bad it is to play a certain style or want you to sacrifice winning now for some perceived pie in the sky. It doesn't matter. If they lose a bunch of games, I don't know about your kid, but I know my kids wouldn't have been as interested in playing.

Have balance. Remember that is it a very, very small percentage of the girls playing that will go on to play at a higher level. And what do you know, at the higher levels they don't always play possession, slow build soccer. Go watch some college games and you will see. Heck, watch the UEFA Champions League and you will see that the majority of the goals are scored on fast counter attacks.

Remember, ignore the trolls and have fun. Take a lot of photos. They are priceless in years to come.
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  #25  
Old 09-16-2013
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If your kid is under the age of 18, my advice after 25 years in this business:

Play soccer (kids) to:

1. Have fun.

2. Learn important life skills such as hard work & discipline.

3. Develop life long friendships. Two of my kids are in college now. One is playing soccer, the other isn't. Both of them have very close friendships with kids they played soccer with. We had parents with both of my kids that were very active in organizing activities and birthday parties and bbq's..etc.

(side note: ironically, my daughter who was superior technically in every aspect didn't get any offers of assistance. My daughter who is a little lightning bolt, but not as skilled, is going to a very nice school that I never could have afforded..go figure).

4. Be active and develop habits of being active. Gets kids out of the house and running and off the TV, video games..etc.

Ignore the purists that talk about how bad it is to play a certain style or want you to sacrifice winning now for some perceived pie in the sky. It doesn't matter. If they lose a bunch of games, I don't know about your kid, but I know my kids wouldn't have been as interested in playing.

Have balance. Remember that is it a very, very small percentage of the girls playing that will go on to play at a higher level. And what do you know, at the higher levels they don't always play possession, slow build soccer. Go watch some college games and you will see. Heck, watch the UEFA Champions League and you will see that the majority of the goals are scored on fast counter attacks.

Remember, ignore the trolls and have fun. Take a lot of photos. They are priceless in years to come.
http://blog.3four3.com/2013/09/16/so...3+%283four3%29
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  #26  
Old 09-16-2013
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You are a complete moron.
I am eager to hear your reasoning...
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  #27  
Old 09-16-2013
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
If your kid is under the age of 18, my advice after 25 years in this business:

Play soccer (kids) to:

1. Have fun.

2. Learn important life skills such as hard work & discipline.

3. Develop life long friendships. Two of my kids are in college now. One is playing soccer, the other isn't. Both of them have very close friendships with kids they played soccer with. We had parents with both of my kids that were very active in organizing activities and birthday parties and bbq's..etc.

(side note: ironically, my daughter who was superior technically in every aspect didn't get any offers of assistance. My daughter who is a little lightning bolt, but not as skilled, is going to a very nice school that I never could have afforded..go figure).

4. Be active and develop habits of being active. Gets kids out of the house and running and off the TV, video games..etc.

Ignore the purists that talk about how bad it is to play a certain style or want you to sacrifice winning now for some perceived pie in the sky. It doesn't matter. If they lose a bunch of games, I don't know about your kid, but I know my kids wouldn't have been as interested in playing.

Have balance. Remember that is it a very, very small percentage of the girls playing that will go on to play at a higher level. And what do you know, at the higher levels they don't always play possession, slow build soccer. Go watch some college games and you will see. Heck, watch the UEFA Champions League and you will see that the majority of the goals are scored on fast counter attacks.

Remember, ignore the trolls and have fun. Take a lot of photos. They are priceless in years to come.

For the most part I agree with this. Most people who are overly concerned with development, I like to ask: why? Is that what your kid wants? To lose now so that they can be better in the future? For me, it's not about what the parents want, it's about what's best for the kids in the big picture. Of course, my daughter might have a great run of 5 years of playing, winning and having fun and at year six might lose badly to your kids who have been "developing". Who cares as long as my kid has a great experience along the way.
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  #28  
Old 09-16-2013
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
If your kid is under the age of 18, my advice after 25 years in this business:

Play soccer (kids) to:

1. Have fun.

2. Learn important life skills such as hard work & discipline.

3. Develop life long friendships. Two of my kids are in college now. One is playing soccer, the other isn't. Both of them have very close friendships with kids they played soccer with. We had parents with both of my kids that were very active in organizing activities and birthday parties and bbq's..etc.

(side note: ironically, my daughter who was superior technically in every aspect didn't get any offers of assistance. My daughter who is a little lightning bolt, but not as skilled, is going to a very nice school that I never could have afforded..go figure).

4. Be active and develop habits of being active. Gets kids out of the house and running and off the TV, video games..etc.

Ignore the purists that talk about how bad it is to play a certain style or want you to sacrifice winning now for some perceived pie in the sky. It doesn't matter. If they lose a bunch of games, I don't know about your kid, but I know my kids wouldn't have been as interested in playing.

Have balance. Remember that is it a very, very small percentage of the girls playing that will go on to play at a higher level. And what do you know, at the higher levels they don't always play possession, slow build soccer. Go watch some college games and you will see. Heck, watch the UEFA Champions League and you will see that the majority of the goals are scored on fast counter attacks.

Remember, ignore the trolls and have fun. Take a lot of photos. They are priceless in years to come.
http://blog.3four3.com/2013/09/16/so...3+%283four3%29

You can spare us the I've been around since the stone ages and I'm so wise stuff. While some college teams play more direct than others, none of them play kick ball. And it's precisely the fact that these times are priceless that I'd like to see a better experience.

Your grandpa good old days comments are all great and mom and apple pie and stuff, the kind of thing that people can't argue against like baby bunny rabbits are cute, but which team in this video do you think is having more fun playing. What experience would your kid rather have. What would you rather watch as a parent. Do you think your speed demon would have been better prepared if she played for the team featured in the first half of the video or the team in the second half. It's not about being a purist, it's about the desire to move beyond kick ball, and

1) have MORE fun than a kick ball team
2) learn MORE about life skills than a kick ball team, like sticking to a discipline, learning to problem solve, building a skill, working as a team
3) developing friendships that are even stronger because 1 and 2 above were so much better than a kick ball team
4 getting out of the house because you love to play because 1, 2, and 3 above are so much better than on a kick ball team
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  #29  
Old 09-16-2013
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For the most part I agree with this. Most people who are overly concerned with development, I like to ask: why? Is that what your kid wants? To lose now so that they can be better in the future? For me, it's not about what the parents want, it's about what's best for the kids in the big picture. Of course, my daughter might have a great run of 5 years of playing, winning and having fun and at year six might lose badly to your kids who have been "developing". Who cares as long as my kid has a great experience along the way.
It is a grand assumption and myth that quality development means you lose. What my kid wants first and foremost is to have fun and a good experience. I just happen to believe that if she is taught well by good teachers and mentors, her soccer experience will be more fun, just like her academic experience would be, her dance team experience would be, etc... Doesn't mean she wants to be or ever will come close to being Mia Hamm, it's just that learning and developing is more fun than just whacking a soccer ball and listening to a coach yell kick it harder and run faster all week long.
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  #30  
Old 09-16-2013
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I am eager to hear your reasoning...
We already have multiple threads discussing possession soccer with multiple people bashing how we play here in Oregon. But in your brilliance, we needed another thread to discuss this topic ad infinitum. If you are so brilliant with soccer, then you should coach. Think of all the good you would be doing the state of Oregon. It doesn't take much to get an E license. A little bit of money, a little time and you will be out there saving the Oregon youth. And you don't need more than a E license since you clearly know how to coach already. The E license is just something to get you in the door to some club.
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