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  #21  
Old 11-28-2016
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Why, do they not have access to already established academic support like the non-athletes?
Most competitive D1 programs have an academic help center for their athletes which helps them with tutoring and the ability to select courses before non athletes which helps prevent conflicts with travel.
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  #22  
Old 11-28-2016
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All Patriot League athletes must be academically consistent with school admissions standards. This is NOT true of "real" D1 programs like BC, Duke, Stanford.

HC can give Athletic grant-in-aid, only after admissions clears them. Makes it hard to stay competitive.

http://graphics.fansonly.com/photos/...min-FinAid.pdf

P-League Policies
2. Academic Principles. Each student-athlete receiving a financial aid award within need or above need shall meet the required academic standards of the institution. Collectively, studentathletes receiving financial aid shall be academically representative of the student body of the institution
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  #23  
Old 11-29-2016
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Both HC men's and women's teams have had disappointing seasons but talk of dropping to a lower league or to D2 is ridiculous. The men beat Duke last year and have played Providence to a draw and a very competitive 2-1 loss in the past 2 seasons. The women are 4-10 in 1-goal games in the past 2 years and are very competitive in the Patriot League; they just need to learn how to win the close ones. Holy Cross only recruits athletes who can meet the academic requirements and their workload is a lot more intense than most schools so they are at a disadvantage but the athletes should be applauded for being true student-athletes instead of getting criticized.
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  #24  
Old 11-29-2016
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Both HC men's and women's teams have had disappointing seasons but talk of dropping to a lower league or to D2 is ridiculous. The men beat Duke last year and have played Providence to a draw and a very competitive 2-1 loss in the past 2 seasons. The women are 4-10 in 1-goal games in the past 2 years and are very competitive in the Patriot League; they just need to learn how to win the close ones. Holy Cross only recruits athletes who can meet the academic requirements and their workload is a lot more intense than most schools so they are at a disadvantage but the athletes should be applauded for being true student-athletes instead of getting criticized.
Believe it or not top D2 teams will do better than that.
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  #25  
Old 11-29-2016
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MK was a lousy, lazy recruiter. Period. That's why he got canned. Many Revs, Bolts, NEFC, Stars boys with excellent grades reached out to him over the past few years and he was notorious for not responding. Those kids moved on to play for other quality D1 schools. You never knew what he was looking for because he was impossible to get in touch with.
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  #26  
Old 11-29-2016
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Bolts need to find a few college coaches who are still employed.
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  #27  
Old 11-29-2016
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MK was a lousy, lazy recruiter. Period. That's why he got canned. Many Revs, Bolts, NEFC, Stars boys with excellent grades reached out to him over the past few years and he was notorious for not responding. Those kids moved on to play for other quality D1 schools. You never knew what he was looking for because he was impossible to get in touch with.
That is not even close to the truth.
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  #28  
Old 11-29-2016
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No one can complain if you compare HC to other Patriot League schools. The Patriot league has admission standards that apply league-wide (and which are significantly more restrictive than a typical D1 school), and some of the other PL schools have academic/admission standards which are tougher than HC's. Question is why HC has struggled as compared with their peers. MA is a crowded college market, and HC will always be second fiddle (in every respect) to BC amongst the locals looking at Catholic schools (as Worcester will be second fiddle (or worse) to Boston. I'm not an insider, but seems like HC could up their profile from a recruiting perspective, as there are lots of good players who want to play D1 but aren't quite BC/UConn material soccer-wise or Ivy League material academically. On the boys side, NEFC does a good job of placing the kids who aren't right for BC with other local schools. If Northeastern used to get first dibs, not sure HC was sharing in the wealth in a similar manner. Of course local kids are just a small piece of the puzzle, but seeing where a school sits recruiting-wise has to be considered.
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  #29  
Old 12-01-2016
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No one can complain if you compare HC to other Patriot League schools. The Patriot league has admission standards that apply league-wide (and which are significantly more restrictive than a typical D1 school), and some of the other PL schools have academic/admission standards which are tougher than HC's. Question is why HC has struggled as compared with their peers. MA is a crowded college market, and HC will always be second fiddle (in every respect) to BC amongst the locals looking at Catholic schools (as Worcester will be second fiddle (or worse) to Boston. I'm not an insider, but seems like HC could up their profile from a recruiting perspective, as there are lots of good players who want to play D1 but aren't quite BC/UConn material soccer-wise or Ivy League material academically. On the boys side, NEFC does a good job of placing the kids who aren't right for BC with other local schools. If Northeastern used to get first dibs, not sure HC was sharing in the wealth in a similar manner. Of course local kids are just a small piece of the puzzle, but seeing where a school sits recruiting-wise has to be considered.
Holy Cross has been and will always be considered a more academically rigorous college experience than BC. In the most recent rankings of Catholic colleges in the US, HC was 3rd to Georgetown and Notre Dame.
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  #30  
Old 12-01-2016
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I am an HC alum and my son plays soccer but is not good enough to play at the school.

The comments here on the academic requirements at HC are true and the role athletics should play is discussed ad nauseum among the alums.

The issue for the athletes at HC, is that there is nowhere to hide. There are no "basket-weaving" courses. Every course requires more than just showing up to class. HC has about 2,700 students. They really do not have part-time programs and have not started any evening graduate programs like many other Catholic schools. HC is strictly an undergraduate Liberal Arts college.

HC also, competes in 25 D1 sports(men & women). There are probably one of only a handful of schools in the country that have as high a percentage of their students competing at the D1 level and the fact is that football and basketball will always be the most important sports at HC. Historically all the non-revenue sports (ncluding soccer) have been an afterthought. Even in the Patriot League they have had a tough time competing in the minor sports because the attention to those sports has not been there.

HC has a new president who feels that athletics should play a bigger role and can be used as a means to attract quality students. HC hired a new athletic director a few years ago whose charge is to raise the profile of athletics - including the non-revenue sports. The school conducted a capital campaign and is redoing the Hart Center and building an indoor training facility that will primarily be used by the football team Ė but I assume will be used by the soccer team as well.

HC has money. Although the endowment is dwarfed by many schools the endowment per student is second only to Notre Dame among the nation's Catholic schools. The alums have historically been very generous to the school and the school boasts that more than 50% of its alums give money to the school each year.

With all this said, however, the fact remains that with 25 D1 sports the amount of scholarship money available to the soccer players is limited. Any coach coming into the program is going to have high expectations and limited resources. I know scholarship money is available to some of the soccer players, but a coach has to parse that money out among the roster and I doubt any one player is getting a full ride. HC is not cheap so this means that the players are going to have to foot some of the tuition bill.

So any player that is recruited needs to be able to perform academically, want to pay for part of the costs(which could be sizable) and want to pursue a strictly Liberal Arts degree. It is not an easy recruiting situation for any coach.

I watched HC beat UNH this year(when UNH was ranked) and I saw them give BC a game last year. I donít know enough about soccer to determine if Koolman is a good coach or not, but it is not going to be easy for any coach who takes the job.
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