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  #1  
Old 02-13-2019
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Default Former Crossfire United ECNL Players Allege Abuse by GCU

Pretty damning article of GCU’s Womens Soccer coaches. The university’s findings are not convincing. This would explain the high turnover of GCUs roster. Two former Crossfire United players are part of the claim of a toxic soccer program.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ar/2550530002/
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Old 02-13-2019
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Pretty damning article of GCU’s Womens Soccer coaches. The university’s findings are not convincing. This would explain the high turnover of GCUs roster. Two former Crossfire United players are part of the claim of a toxic soccer program.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ar/2550530002/
Not good.
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Old 02-13-2019
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You'd think schools would learn their lesson. Any hint of sexual scandal can do serious damage to a school's reputation (granted, its GCU, but still). Then if you don't handle it well you've exacerbated the problems ten-fold.
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Crossfire United players for maybe more than a year...
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Pretty damning article of GCU’s Womens Soccer coaches. The university’s findings are not convincing. This would explain the high turnover of GCUs roster. Two former Crossfire United players are part of the claim of a toxic soccer program.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...ar/2550530002/
Majority of the team is in support of the coach...

Who’s toxic? A few players or the coaches and administrators?

I lean more toward the later but how many teams have a few entitled parents and kids..
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Wow, I don't really know what to think here.

OP, why did you title this article "Former Crossfire United ECNL Players...?" Why not "Washington Timbers coach alleges abuse of his daughter...?" Both are connections that may be of interest to readers of your thread. This is a serious issue and it feels like you are trying to push some sort of pro or anti ECNL agenda. That has zero to do with this particular situation.

In terms of the allegations, I read the entire article and genuinely don't know what to think. Overbearing helicopter parents and players who weren't used to being criticized/told their efforts needed improvement? Maybe. But some of the details are quite disturbing. I would be very concerned if this school was on my DD's short list.
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Wow, I don't really know what to think here.

OP, why did you title this article "Former Crossfire United ECNL Players...?" Why not "Washington Timbers coach alleges abuse of his daughter...?" Both are connections that may be of interest to readers of your thread. This is a serious issue and it feels like you are trying to push some sort of pro or anti ECNL agenda. That has zero to do with this particular situation.

In terms of the allegations, I read the entire article and genuinely don't know what to think. Overbearing helicopter parents and players who weren't used to being criticized/told their efforts needed improvement? Maybe. But some of the details are quite disturbing. I would be very concerned if this school was on my DD's short list.
Sounds like an old-school coach who hasn't gotten the memo, at the various least. "Run 'em till they puke", especially as punishment for a loss, has long been a staple of the coach's toolbox, and one occasionally still sees it even in youth soccer, though it's becoming less and less. American football lore is fond of the story of the "Junction Boys"--how Bear Bryant, back when he was first hired at Texas A&M, hauled his team out to the middle of the Texas prairie for some physical training that made Marine boot camp look like yoga class. Reportedly a few players were placed in medical danger as a result of this, but A&M were the champions at the end of the season (the first of many earned by the Bear in his career), so the virtues of this sort of training are often sung.

And often times, the line between reasonable training and abuse is often blurry. How many suicides on the field are excessive, vs. how many are within the reasonable and expected capabilities of an athlete?

Lots of interesting things to discuss here.
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  #8  
Old 02-13-2019
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Quote:
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Sounds like an old-school coach who hasn't gotten the memo, at the various least. "Run 'em till they puke", especially as punishment for a loss, has long been a staple of the coach's toolbox, and one occasionally still sees it even in youth soccer, though it's becoming less and less. American football lore is fond of the story of the "Junction Boys"--how Bear Bryant, back when he was first hired at Texas A&M, hauled his team out to the middle of the Texas prairie for some physical training that made Marine boot camp look like yoga class. Reportedly a few players were placed in medical danger as a result of this, but A&M were the champions at the end of the season (the first of many earned by the Bear in his career), so the virtues of this sort of training are often sung.

And often times, the line between reasonable training and abuse is often blurry. How many suicides on the field are excessive, vs. how many are within the reasonable and expected capabilities of an athlete?

Lots of interesting things to discuss here.
And the entire coach/player relationship, combined with the pressures of receiving money (in the form of scholarship aid) to play, creates an environment where the coach has an excessive amount of power and the player may feel afraid to speak up.
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  #9  
Old 02-13-2019
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Sounds like an old-school coach who hasn't gotten the memo, at the various least. "Run 'em till they puke", especially as punishment for a loss, has long been a staple of the coach's toolbox, and one occasionally still sees it even in youth soccer, though it's becoming less and less. American football lore is fond of the story of the "Junction Boys"--how Bear Bryant, back when he was first hired at Texas A&M, hauled his team out to the middle of the Texas prairie for some physical training that made Marine boot camp look like yoga class. Reportedly a few players were placed in medical danger as a result of this, but A&M were the champions at the end of the season (the first of many earned by the Bear in his career), so the virtues of this sort of training are often sung.

And often times, the line between reasonable training and abuse is often blurry. How many suicides on the field are excessive, vs. how many are within the reasonable and expected capabilities of an athlete?

Lots of interesting things to discuss here.
I agree. This sounds like your typical outdated dinosaur teaching the game incorrectly. He would fit right in with local high school coaching jobs
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  #10  
Old 02-13-2019
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Is GCU a club? A college?
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