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  #11  
Old 02-03-2010
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I played D1 baseball in college. It is very difficult but can be done. I liked to party to much as did most of my team so I did not achieve great things in college. Did graduate but with a useless degree. That is my biggest regret in life. You really only have one shot at that. We did have a couple of guys that were outstanding students and one was in pre med. His dad was a doctor. We never saw him out. He was either at baseball or studying.

It is all about choices. Do you want to sacrifice a few years of your life or do you want to be a socialite. It is really that simple. My best friend is a dermatologist and played college tennis. So it can be done.

My advice would be to play soccer and study your butt off. The time you missed going out can be made up when you have the money to do it right. If you don't you will regret it later in life when real memories can be made.
One of the best posts on here in a long time. Well done
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  #12  
Old 02-03-2010
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I played D1 baseball in college. It is very difficult but can be done. I liked to party to much as did most of my team so I did not achieve great things in college. Did graduate but with a useless degree. That is my biggest regret in life. You really only have one shot at that. We did have a couple of guys that were outstanding students and one was in pre med. His dad was a doctor. We never saw him out. He was either at baseball or studying.

It is all about choices. Do you want to sacrifice a few years of your life or do you want to be a socialite. It is really that simple. My best friend is a dermatologist and played college tennis. So it can be done.

My advice would be to play soccer and study your butt off. The time you missed going out can be made up when you have the money to do it right. If you don't you will regret it later in life when real memories can be made.
I'm not sure I totally agree with this, although tough to know without knowing what you do now, how you feel you're doing with your family, etc, etc. I went to a good school, played a college sport, and I had a great time. As many say "best 4 years of my life," and I remember many days when my friends and I would look at each other and say "Isn't college fun?" If you know you want to be a physician or be an engineer, or whatever, then how you hard you work may have to be factored in. But there is (to use a word overused in this forum) a "development" aspect to college as well and figuring out who one is socially and otherwise. There is no guarantee that the kid who shuts everything out to ensure he goes to med school is going to be happy later or feel successful in other key areas of his/her life. Some of these people get divorced 2-3 times, don't really know their kids, or have no idea who they are aside from their professional identity (which may have been rather robotically shaped by keeping up with the achievement treadmill). The cost certainly is impacting what college is and can be for some, but I wish it was less pre-professional than it has become and more old school in terms of using some of the time to explore and figure out who the hell you are.
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  #13  
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I'm not sure I totally agree with this, although tough to know without knowing what you do now, how you feel you're doing with your family, etc, etc. I went to a good school, played a college sport, and I had a great time. As many say "best 4 years of my life," and I remember many days when my friends and I would look at each other and say "Isn't college fun?" If you know you want to be a physician or be an engineer, or whatever, then how you hard you work may have to be factored in. But there is (to use a word overused in this forum) a "development" aspect to college as well and figuring out who one is socially and otherwise. There is no guarantee that the kid who shuts everything out to ensure he goes to med school is going to be happy later or feel successful in other key areas of his/her life. Some of these people get divorced 2-3 times, don't really know their kids, or have no idea who they are aside from their professional identity (which may have been rather robotically shaped by keeping up with the achievement treadmill). The cost certainly is impacting what college is and can be for some, but I wish it was less pre-professional than it has become and more old school in terms of using some of the time to explore and figure out who the hell you are.
I am a real estate appraiser. Family life is great but the job sucks. The appraisal industry is one of the worst jobs to have at this time. I wish someone would have told me to figure out what you want to do for a living before you go to college. I had a blast in college playing baseball and going out but totally regret that I did not have someone pushing me to take school more serious.

Part of the problem was that I thought I was going to play pro ball. I only went to college for baseball. Two operations my first two years put a end to that dream.

My boys dream of playing pro soccer. I support their dream 100% but I always tell them school is #1 and that you need a back up plan.

Play hard and study harder in school. The security you will feel from a great education is worth the sacrifice you make in college.
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  #14  
Old 02-03-2010
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there are real tradeoffs - the time invested in a sport is not available for something else, like studying and research. In some sports, frequent out of town trips mean missed classes and inevitably lower grades. Athletes in top varsity programs in time consuming sports (like football, basketball and hockey) are usually in majors like economics and very rarely in the sciences. And the ones thinking about pro contracts are definitely not interested in academics. Finally, in colleges where academics are more important than athletics (like the Ivy league), athletes don't get the adulation or attention you might think, and actually are somewhat socially segregated.
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  #15  
Old 02-03-2010
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I am a real estate appraiser. Family life is great but the job sucks. The appraisal industry is one of the worst jobs to have at this time. I wish someone would have told me to figure out what you want to do for a living before you go to college. I had a blast in college playing baseball and going out but totally regret that I did not have someone pushing me to take school more serious.

Part of the problem was that I thought I was going to play pro ball. I only went to college for baseball. Two operations my first two years put a end to that dream.

My boys dream of playing pro soccer. I support their dream 100% but I always tell them school is #1 and that you need a back up plan.

Play hard and study harder in school. The security you will feel from a great education is worth the sacrifice you make in college.
It's funny, because going through the college search process now I realize how much I would like to go to college again. I am much interested in all the schools than my son.

I personally think age 17 or 18 is way too young to expect a child/young adult to know what they want to do. Maybe they have a glimmer or know they like science/math better than english or whatever, but more likely than not I think most have fallen in love with some image of doing something and/or their parents have heavily influenced the choice. That's why I think some are very smart to do a PG year, and I think, in terms of what you're talking about, a fair number of kids would benefit by starting college at 21 or 22 or even after age 25.
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  #16  
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I am a real estate appraiser. Family life is great but the job sucks. The appraisal industry is one of the worst jobs to have at this time. I wish someone would have told me to figure out what you want to do for a living before you go to college. I had a blast in college playing baseball and going out but totally regret that I did not have someone pushing me to take school more serious.

Part of the problem was that I thought I was going to play pro ball. I only went to college for baseball. Two operations my first two years put a end to that dream.

My boys dream of playing pro soccer. I support their dream 100% but I always tell them school is #1 and that you need a back up plan.

Play hard and study harder in school. The security you will feel from a great education is worth the sacrifice you make in college.
Again a great post. I fooled around in college too, almost not able to graduate. But I found what I like in graduate school and did ok since then. Only very very few can make it to the pro. Education should always be first.
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  #17  
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It's funny, because going through the college search process now I realize how much I would like to go to college again. I am much interested in all the schools than my son.

I personally think age 17 or 18 is way too young to expect a child/young adult to know what they want to do. Maybe they have a glimmer or know they like science/math better than english or whatever, but more likely than not I think most have fallen in love with some image of doing something and/or their parents have heavily influenced the choice. That's why I think some are very smart to do a PG year, and I think, in terms of what you're talking about, a fair number of kids would benefit by starting college at 21 or 22 or even after age 25.
I would agree with that. I feel I am more prepared to go to college now at 38 then I was at 18. I was the first to graduate from college in my family so my parents did not have much experience to provide direction.
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  #18  
Old 02-04-2010
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Athletes in top varsity programs in time consuming sports (like football, basketball and hockey) are usually in majors like economics and very rarely in the sciences. And the ones thinking about pro contracts are definitely not interested in academics.
Poppycock. Particularly the second point. I had a student in a course back in 90 or 91. Excellent student. Did well in class. This was at a D1 big time sports school. He was a 4 year varsity basketball letter winner after being red shirted freshman year. The bball program there has never won a title but has one, maybe two final four appearances and I know they made sweet sixteen several more times. He was a first round NBA draft pick playing 10 yrs in the NBA, many as a starter, and averaged around 10 ppg for his career and 15 ppg in his better years. Excellent all-around floor game. He graduated, not with a Bachelors after those five years, but with a Masters. In math. Have you looked at the coursework required to major and get a BS in math, let alone a Masters? I don't know his GPA but my god man....most of the good students in this country run away from majoring in math, physics, and engineering because they are too hard for us nowadays! Good students know they can earn as much in majors that don't require them to work as hard as those subjects.

I know its one student. But it can be done. Met a D3 soccer player this past year who was carrying a 4.0 as a senior pre-med major. He may have been captain too. Think he'll get in to med school?

There are no generalizations to follow. Every individual is different.
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2010
beentheredonethat beentheredonethat is offline
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Poppycock. Particularly the second point. I had a student in a course back in 90 or 91. Excellent student. Did well in class. This was at a D1 big time sports school. He was a 4 year varsity basketball letter winner after being red shirted freshman year. The bball program there has never won a title but has one, maybe two final four appearances and I know they made sweet sixteen several more times. He was a first round NBA draft pick playing 10 yrs in the NBA, many as a starter, and averaged around 10 ppg for his career and 15 ppg in his better years. Excellent all-around floor game. He graduated, not with a Bachelors after those five years, but with a Masters. In math. Have you looked at the coursework required to major and get a BS in math, let alone a Masters? I don't know his GPA but my god man....most of the good students in this country run away from majoring in math, physics, and engineering because they are too hard for us nowadays! Good students know they can earn as much in majors that don't require them to work as hard as those subjects.

I know its one student. But it can be done. Met a D3 soccer player this past year who was carrying a 4.0 as a senior pre-med major. He may have been captain too. Think he'll get in to med school?

There are no generalizations to follow. Every individual is different.
I love posts like this. You have a guy who experienced the life telling us that one of the big regrets in his life is that his personal immaturity prevented him from taking advantage of the educational opportunity that was presented to him and we get folks like this from the peanut gallery who cite one example from afar that worked out to suggest that he has no idea what he is talking about. The example given was probably an extraordinary student and very driven to begin with. I would not be surprised if the kid was a class valedictorian or close to it. Does anyone doubt that they would have been successful where ever they went to school? The point that the original poster was making was not that it was impossible but rather that there are alot of distractions involved with being an athlete/student and if your kid does not really have the drive to be a student they can get through college with very little or nothing to show for it. The real issue is you have to be objective about your kid, if they are the type of academically motivated person that can avoid temptation for the sake of school, they will have no problem in college regardless of whether they play a sport or not. If your kid is not, then you really need to evaluate the situation carefully because the reality is that the environment typically will not foster an academic drive for them.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2010
beentheredonethat beentheredonethat is offline
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Another point that I would like to make is that this sort of post represents a fairly typical "academic" point of view. A lot of professors and school administrators will hold up the expectional student/athlete as the standard for all athletes to emulate with seemingly little respect to either the academic or athletic environment they exist in. Honestly the type of student/athlete they will point to is not really representative of an average student much less one that is primarily focused on their sports performance. Unfortunately this sort of mindset creates a lot of false academic expectations and helps to create an environment where most athletes end up being viewed as failures.

You also need to understand how easy it is for an athlete to become myopically focused on their sports perfromance and not school. Athletes, have more structure than just about any other student on campus. Do not lose site of the fact that the whole point of that structure is to actually help the athlete perform their sport not excel in the classroom.

Last edited by beentheredonethat; 02-04-2010 at 10:04 AM.
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