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Concerns about Refs and the State of Play

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post

    Nope. Just saying these aren’t new things as your initial post implies.
    Thanks for your response, but it’s new to me and very surprising. I’m not sure what the point is to say “Well thats just the way things are.” Obviously, this doesn’t bother some people, but does this change at some point? I’m tired of going to games to watch kids kick balls all over the place and then have to teach my child not to do the same thing. I’m sorry but it was not like that when I was a kid, even at the select and Premiere levels. This is a sad moment in time.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post

    Thanks that’s not reassuring when we are talking about development. If anything, you are saying it’s okay because it’s been happening for sometime. Based on what I’m seeing it’s only certain clubs and it’s kind of sad that people pay money for this type of play. I’m not seeing an emphasis at all on kids developing, only strategies to win a game.

    I could care less about the size, strength, and speed of the youth. That gets weeded out in time. I’m more concerned that the actual clubs prescribe to this method of kickball and how this reduces the understanding of soccer then rely on referees to make calls in their favor when they just kicked the ball all over the place acting as if they are playing the same game. Yes, it’s a strategy, but it’s sad that we pay so much to think you’re child will have some team that wants to play against them only to learn they will just kick the ball out of bounds, to the other team, and at kids heads when they are not allowed to head the ball.

    Way to go WA State!!! You are raising future intramural players, not college athletes. Especially at these top clubs, they always say they are so good, but no one is asking how they play or what their strategy is. Good for you parents on an all winning team, that don’t see anything wrong. As a spectator, I’m really disappointed.
    Nope. Just saying these aren’t new things as your initial post implies.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post
    I have been around the local youth soccer scene for some time. There is no more kickball than there was 15 years ago. Also, bigger, stronger, and faster Kids have been prioritized in all sports since the beginning of time.
    Thanks that’s not reassuring when we are talking about development. If anything, you are saying it’s okay because it’s been happening for sometime. Based on what I’m seeing it’s only certain clubs and it’s kind of sad that people pay money for this type of play. I’m not seeing an emphasis at all on kids developing, only strategies to win a game.

    I could care less about the size, strength, and speed of the youth. That gets weeded out in time. I’m more concerned that the actual clubs prescribe to this method of kickball and how this reduces the understanding of soccer then rely on referees to make calls in their favor when they just kicked the ball all over the place acting as if they are playing the same game. Yes, it’s a strategy, but it’s sad that we pay so much to think you’re child will have some team that wants to play against them only to learn they will just kick the ball out of bounds, to the other team, and at kids heads when they are not allowed to head the ball.

    Way to go WA State!!! You are raising future intramural players, not college athletes. Especially at these top clubs, they always say they are so good, but no one is asking how they play or what their strategy is. Good for you parents on an all winning team, that don’t see anything wrong. As a spectator, I’m really disappointed.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    When I look back on the past few weeks of my kid's soccer, the refs were impactful, but when I look back on the entirety of my kid's soccer career, the refs are very far down the list of things that had an impact.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I have been around the local youth soccer scene for some time. There is no more kickball than there was 15 years ago. Also, bigger, stronger, and faster Kids have been prioritized in all sports since the beginning of time.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post

    The kickball "epidemic" is happening b/c its effective at the younger ages. Especially if you have a bigger and faster team.
    I tend to agree with this assessment. It can be simultaneously true that the younger kids are playing kickball and also developing/learning possession soccer. If you see the younger teams trying to play possession in their own quarter, they don't tend to have the ball control necessary quite yet. I have a kid this age, and we work on passing/receiving outside of official training, and at official training they are indeed practicing the necessary things, but it's also a weakest-link challenge too. There are players on the team that will turn it over if asked to make a quality short pass. The young players are smart enough to know when booting it is the right choice, which unfortunately is more often than we'd probably like.

    This isn't unlike professional play. When things break down especially with superior pressure, EPL players will boot it too. But it's most notable in comparing MLS versus EPL - one man's possession soccer is another man's boot ball. The EPL players can make and receive passes that are impossible to MLS players, so you think "wow they have better coaching" when in fact they are just better players who can do possession soccer in the face of physically gifted defenders. The same difference, but to a larger extent, exists between EPL and little kids in Washington State playing soccer. I'd say have some patience and let the kids develop. When the kids have the skills for possession, they will start to do it to a greater degree. If you feel like your kids not being prepped for it at your team's trainings, then take your kid to a field and practice quick ground passes with them, along with similar skills. Then, when possession soccer starts to take hold, your kid won't be the weak link.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post
    After having two games this weekend, I had difficulty sleeping over how referees could dictate the result of a game. I always believed there was a bit of bias, but I have never seen so many kids get touched fall to the ground crying in hysteria to receive a penalty or a foul call, only to get up like nothing happened to them. Is this being taught at the young ages? It’s not a coincidence, because it’s happening quite frequently. It’s even more disappointing, because these games are recorded. I’m wondering if clubs are teaching players to just go down in the box or overexaggerate like some of the professional players? Are refs even paying attention to this? There was a situation where a player slipped and they called a PK, the linesman tried to tell the ref there was no foul since he had the better view and the ref continued with a PK.

    This leads to the state of play, where I have noticed a significant amount of kick ball being played and it’s so ugly to watch. There is no build up play, it just kick the ball and chaotic chase to whoever gets to the ball first and maybe a PK gets called or lucky to get a goal.

    I’m wondering if it’s just me as a frustrated parent or are other experiencing the same thing?
    The kickball "epidemic" is happening b/c its effective at the younger ages. Especially if you have a bigger and faster team.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I’ve noticed in the last 3 games we’ve had refs that were awful, and the state of play you mentioned is because XF/SU just pick the tallest and fastest to win games at an early age and they have zero technical ability. Other teams have to play like them to compete or win and the game turns into a **** show

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    > Are refs even paying attention to this?

    the ones that are actually running to keep up with the game are paying attention. The other 90% are still on the other side of the pitch slowly walking to where the action is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Concerns about Refs and the State of Play

    Concerns about Refs and the State of Play

    After having two games this weekend, I had difficulty sleeping over how referees could dictate the result of a game. I always believed there was a bit of bias, but I have never seen so many kids get touched fall to the ground crying in hysteria to receive a penalty or a foul call, only to get up like nothing happened to them. Is this being taught at the young ages? It’s not a coincidence, because it’s happening quite frequently. It’s even more disappointing, because these games are recorded. I’m wondering if clubs are teaching players to just go down in the box or overexaggerate like some of the professional players? Are refs even paying attention to this? There was a situation where a player slipped and they called a PK, the linesman tried to tell the ref there was no foul since he had the better view and the ref continued with a PK.

    This leads to the state of play, where I have noticed a significant amount of kick ball being played and it’s so ugly to watch. There is no build up play, it just kick the ball and chaotic chase to whoever gets to the ball first and maybe a PK gets called or lucky to get a goal.

    I’m wondering if it’s just me as a frustrated parent or are other experiencing the same thing?
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