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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Yes the size of the athletic scholarship offer is highly correlated to how badly the coach wants you. If you're getting <20% that's a possible warning (although some coaches may up it if you exceed expectations). Plenty of kids getting nothing or barely book money. There's only so many ways to slice up 14 scholarships

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    What did the club say?
    if she is on a legit ECNL Team she will get offers. The "top Players" will have more options than the bubble players, but most kids in ECNL (all of Stars Blue) have offers and make commitments to play somewhere.
    For a player at that level a scholarship is definitely in play. The size of that scholarship is what matters. The size will depend on how much BETTER she is than what they normally recruit.

    Too many think that because she's "good enough" to play at URI, HC or Merrimack, she will get a good scholarship. She won't. They already have a bunch of players at that level and a line of others waiting to come in. Token amounts will be offered, and she can hold a pen on NLI Signing Day.
    To get a significant offer, she needs to be a significant improvement to the team. Target well, and don't discount DII (e.g. Bentley)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post

    Bowdoin one of the most difficult schools to gain admission at sub 8% acceptance rate. They have a huge endowment and are generous with financial aid and do not offer athletic $.
    No D3s have athletic $. However many D3s like Bowdoin have big endowments and can craft merit packages that match or even be lower than in state schools. Same with many private D1s. No one should exclude high price schools until after they get accepted and see what the offers are.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post
    Go with ECRL or DPL team to save some money. No need to go Ivy for education major. Especially if you are teaching K-8. Focus on keeping debt low. ECRL. Teams coming from Stars get commits to D2 and D3 schools all the time. Plenty of schools in New England offer teaching degrees and will offer money to play there via grants and scholarships.
    Merrimack
    Bodoin
    Franklin Pierce
    Bridgewater
    Endicott
    Wheaton
    Westfield
    Bentley


    Bowdoin one of the most difficult schools to gain admission at sub 8% acceptance rate. They have a huge endowment and are generous with financial aid and do not offer athletic $.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Although ECNL no doubt gets more looks, and opportunities, if your player is going to college to be a teacher (respectable) then limit debt. ECRL is also going to get you looks and money for colleges with education programs via grants. Sure you have to hustle more to connect with the coaches but plenty of non D1 athletes have gotten money via grants at D2 and D3 colleges. No need to focus on ECNL or D1. There’s a school for all top players. In my opinion a top player is not just ECNL. It’s ECNL, GA, ECRL, and DPL. These teams have players that can find spots in many schools. Cast a wide net. It’s not ECNL/GA or no money.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Dropping to ECRL will dramatically drop the possibility of a scholarship as ECNL is where the recruiting is done. Is she on a strong ECNL team? if she is a mid level player on a strong team, it is OK as the team will get a lot of looks from a lot of coached during showcases and if you have a good coach, he/she will play everyone as showcases aren't about winning. My daughter's ECNL team had all but 2 players get recruited, and other than the ones that went to ivies or D3, they all got some $$.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Go with ECRL or DPL team to save some money. No need to go Ivy for education major. Especially if you are teaching K-8. Focus on keeping debt low. ECRL. Teams coming from Stars get commits to D2 and D3 schools all the time. Plenty of schools in New England offer teaching degrees and will offer money to play there via grants and scholarships.
    Merrimack
    Bodoin
    Franklin Pierce
    Bridgewater
    Endicott
    Wheaton
    Westfield
    Bentley



    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    SNHU may actually be the best college around when it comes to pedagogy and student learning outcomes.
    It is not selective however, and most people, me included, equate "High Academics" with selectivity. The benefit of the NESCAC is that other people's kids didn't get in. The benefit of SNHU is you might actually learn something.

    There are ~2,600 on-campus students and over 140,000 enrolled online. While the priority is the revenue from the 140K the 2,600 on-campus get to reap the rewards. The campus is a Beard that legitimizes it as a "real school" for the 140K and the 2,600 on-campus students are essentially NPCs.
    This isn't a bad thing. SNHU doesn't need to make money on the campus.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I’d also emphasize that her academics are really really good. That will help especially if she’s not a top level player.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Look at Southern New Hampshire University. Programs for future teachers and good D2 soccer. Just an option to explore

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    You never know until they give you the final deal, which is why casting a wide net matters. A school you thought wasn't affordable very well may be.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Honestly sometimes the D1 scholarship isn’t always what it cracks up to be. Assuming a roster of 28 (just for math purposes) and you have 14 available, conceivably that could be split at 50% for each player. Assume that is what is awarded and with a $50k tuition (again, just mathing here) that would come to $25k you are responsible for.

    After that is awarded, the Financial Aid office looks to see what you qualify for and takes that into account. We did a mock financial aid and it looked like we would get about 50% off tuition. Her first year athletic scholarship was that same amount. When the aid came through, we didn’t get anything. I believe if she had no scholarship she would’ve got the same aid, just allocated differently There is no way our financials were looked at and they thought we didn’t qualify for a break off the full tuition.

    Now in future years her scholarship goes up so we could still end up ahead. And while they say academic and athletic can be layered on top of each other, she didn’t get any academic dollars which surprised everyone. I wont be convinced everything wasnt looked at for that first year and the school decided we could pay “X” and moved the numbers around from whatever bucket to make it fit.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Telling a kid to move to the regional team to save money is a good idea if in 8th grade, but if mid way high school I’d finish up the soccer on current team with friends and coach you like. It’s refreshing to hear of a kid who wants to go into teaching. Less and less of the upcoming generation showing interest in this field. I bet there are scholarships for those who want to specifically be teachers on top of coming in as a soccer player. UMass colleges as well as UNH, URI, and UVM may have opportunities for soccer scholarships and teacher grants.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post
    You could always drop down a level from ECNL into a cheaper program with less travel, and put the rest of the money towards the college fund. It sounds like top D1 is well out of reach for her, both on a financial and talent level so why waste money chasing it?
    There are 330 D1 programs plus D2 schools with athletic money. Garnering a decent athletic scholarship is more about targeting than anything else and theres many opportunitiesout there outside of top programs. Plus many D3s give great $ of they want you.

    Sounds like the ops kid is in the last final push. Saving a few grand is not going to dramatically change their savings account and they'd lose the best platform for exposure.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Guest View Post
    Teaching is a field that seems to always need people. It’s also a nice job for someone who wants to be a coach on the side, and summers off to travel or be a parent. If you can go D1 I would look at a state school as they have good teaching programs. Not sure which private colleges have them? I believe education majors have flexibility to also play D1 as the major doesn’t require labs etc.

    Top 2 States: Teachers are making
    1. New York: $90,222
    2. Massachusetts: $86,755
    Some of the highest COLA states too. Entry level teacher pay is way less. Unfortunately many have dropped out after 5 years too. It's a very rewarding but challenging profession.

    Many privates have respected teaching programs. As others have said privates can often do better wirh aid vs your state school. Grad school will probably be in the cards too so take that into account

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