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How do you video kids soccer games?

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    How do you video kids soccer games?

    How do you video kids soccer games? Do you do it? Why some parents do it? What is the best equipment? Anything related is appreciated!

    #2
    If you're asking then you're probably not missing anything. If you want to watch hours of your kid play years from now when you're old? Send it to the grandparents (who don't care that much)? Think the kid will want to watch it later? (they probably won't) Some parents feel the need to record every minute of their kids lives when in reality a few highlights are plenty.

    The only time you "need " footage is for college recruiting which isn't until high school.

    Comment


      #3
      My kid likes watching clips from his games and every so often pulls up clips from a couple years ago. It’s fun for him to see the progress he’s made. After a few different camera options, I’ve settled on my iPhone Pro Max 11 because I can easily zoom in and out as needed to stay with the play.

      My kid’s grandparents love to follow along with my son by watching a few shortened clips I post to our family’s Apple Photo sharing feed. My dad coached my soccer teams so maybe we are unique.

      Video is a useful tool to pick up on the things you miss. The rude poster above clearly wouldn’t know what to look for in video or how to coach with it. If your first video is intended for college I am quite sure you are going to have footage riddled with opportunities that would have been caught years ago by just watching the plays where you or your teammates fail.

      Comment


        #4
        My kid likes watching clips from his games and every so often pulls up clips from a couple years ago. It’s fun for him to see the progress he’s made. After a few different camera options, I’ve settled on my iPhone Pro Max 11 because I can easily zoom in and out as needed to stay with the play.

        My kid’s grandparents love to follow along with my son by watching a few shortened clips I post to our family’s Apple Photo sharing feed. My dad coached my soccer teams so maybe we are unique.

        Video is a useful tool to pick up on the things you miss. The rude poster above clearly wouldn’t know what to look for in video or how to coach with it. If your first video is intended for college I am quite sure you are going to have footage riddled with opportunities that would have been caught years ago by just watching the plays where you or your teammates fail.

        Comment


          #5
          Give another of your kids a few bucks to film the games. I like to watch and have no patience for filming. It's amazing how little each player touches the ball each game. If you watch an entire game, you might get 30 seconds of decent highlights of your kid if you're lucky.

          Comment


            #6
            I used to record video of my daughter playing using a camera on a tripod. Her club now records most matches so we don’t need to do it any longer. She is not in high school yet and is used as a training tool. Sometimes we watch it together and sometimes she would watch on her own. It helps her to see things from a different perspective. I would use it to help me understand where she needs development and to shape our training sessions. In my own experience, it was one of the biggest boosts to her understanding the game and improving her tactics.

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              #7
              You don't need anything super fancy -- I've been using my phone and it's worked out great so far.

              Comment


                #8
                Use a tripod or other device to keep the camera steady. Better is set it and forget it. Enjoy the game and don't futz. I find video taping distracting

                When my oldest was moving into recruiting age a group of parents on the team took turns recording games then shared the footage. That way a bunch of parents weren't stuck behind cameras

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Guest View Post
                  Give another of your kids a few bucks to film the games. I like to watch and have no patience for filming. It's amazing how little each player touches the ball each game. If you watch an entire game, you might get 30 seconds of decent highlights of your kid if you're lucky.
                  Lol very true! That's why when your player is moving into recruiting age you need a lot of footage. Fortunately your video only needs to be 2-4 min max. Anything much more than that coaches don't watch

                  And FYI it's mostly assistant coaches that screen footage, not the head coach. Some programs don't watch any footage at all.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Guest View Post

                    Lol very true! That's why when your player is moving into recruiting age you need a lot of footage. Fortunately your video only needs to be 2-4 min max. Anything much more than that coaches don't watch

                    And FYI it's mostly assistant coaches that screen footage, not the head coach. Some programs don't watch any footage at all.
                    I disagree with you and the prior poster. Pretty unusual if you’re only getting 30 seconds of quality footage from a game. That tells me that either your kid doesn’t get on the ball much or has no remarkable defensive skills, not winning tackles, not winning balls in the air, unremarkable passing skills, etc. One clip alone could be 10-15 seconds, coaches like the highlight itself obviously, but they also really like to see what led up to the highlight.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Guest View Post

                      I disagree with you and the prior poster. Pretty unusual if you’re only getting 30 seconds of quality footage from a game. That tells me that either your kid doesn’t get on the ball much or has no remarkable defensive skills, not winning tackles, not winning balls in the air, unremarkable passing skills, etc. One clip alone could be 10-15 seconds, coaches like the highlight itself obviously, but they also really like to see what led up to the highlight.
                      Try opening your lens on a Ginga sideline. It's like a swarm of paparazzi locusts.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Guest View Post
                        You don't need anything super fancy -- I've been using my phone and it's worked out great so far.
                        I am genuinely amazed at people who can use their phones to capture video. I try and end up watching video of the ground, sky and generally anything there besides the actual game.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Guest View Post

                          I disagree with you and the prior poster. Pretty unusual if you’re only getting 30 seconds of quality footage from a game. That tells me that either your kid doesn’t get on the ball much or has no remarkable defensive skills, not winning tackles, not winning balls in the air, unremarkable passing skills, etc. One clip alone could be 10-15 seconds, coaches like the highlight itself obviously, but they also really like to see what led up to the highlight.
                          If a coach is interested in a player they will often ask for game footage, not just the highlights. But as for memorable moments - have you seen a lot of the soccer out there these days? Lots of players have no business thinking they can play in college.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Guest View Post

                            I am genuinely amazed at people who can use their phones to capture video. I try and end up watching video of the ground, sky and generally anything there besides the actual game.
                            I rest it on my knee and pivot it. Not Spielberg quality and would never use it for recruiting film but works well for my kid/family to watch and identify the small things that need work

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Guest View Post

                              If a coach is interested in a player they will often ask for game footage, not just the highlights. But as for memorable moments - have you seen a lot of the soccer out there these days? Lots of players have no business thinking they can play in college.
                              You’re correct, but good highlights are typically the hook. If they like the highlights they’ll want more full game footage, especially if the college isn’t geographically close by. With the exception of national showcases, most coaches aren’t traveling any long distance to watch games. This isn’t football or basketball.

                              Comment

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